I wish I’d paid attention in science class.

For those who think historical romance writers don’t do enough research, I think I can disprove that theory.

Mired in rewrites, I am spending waaaay too much time on research of nebulous little niggles that no one else will notice in the long run, but that are going to drive me bonkers. I find myself hung up on the weirdest details.

Does the moon rise at the same time each night? (I don’t think so.)

What about the timing of the tides and the rise and fall of the moon? (Help?)

And a bunch of other questions that I am obsessing over. Some are questions I don’t even know how to research. I want to be concentrating on the emotional nuances, the lovely spectacle of a man and woman falling in love, exciting scenes of smugglers, excitement, danger… and instead I’m reading tide charts and moon phase calendars. (Writer falls to knees weeping.)

Help! I need a book entitled ‘Science for Dummy Historical Romance Writers Who Didn’t Pay Enough Attention to Science Because, Why Would a Writer need Science?’

I truly wish I’d paid more attention in science class.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “I wish I’d paid attention in science class.

  1. The moon rises about an hour later each day. At full moon, the moon rises at sunset and sets at dawn. At new moon, it rises at dawn and sets at sunset.

    Here’s a link (US Naval Observatory) that will give you the sun and moon rise times for one year for any location. You do need the location’s latitude and longitude, but you can get this from the same site

    http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneYear.php

    Here’s the link for one day
    http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneDay.php

    to get latitude and longitude:
    http://earth-info.nga.mil/gns/html/index.html

    and select
    Click Here for the Text Based GNS Search page

    I haven’t really done too much with tides, but here’s a couple of sites for England.

    http://www.britishinformation.com/tide-times/

    I think you have to pay for these next ones.

    http://easytide.ukho.gov.uk/EASYTIDE/EasyTide/SelectPort.aspx

    http://easytide.ukho.gov.uk/EasyTide/EasyTide/index.aspx

    For the US, you can use the National Weather Service for free.
    http://www.tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov/

    Good luck.

  2. Thank you, Linda! These links will be invaluable. Writing is such a humbling game… the more I write, the more I realize I don’t know about the world and history, and science, and people and… you get the picture!

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